David Beckham reveals what he’ll look like at 70 as he fronts malaria campaign

David Beckham has revealed what he’ll look like at the age of 70 in a new campaign to defeat malaria.  

The footballer, 45, was digitally altered to look older as he delivered an impassioned speech from a future where malaria had been eradicated.

He says in the clip: ‘Today, our world has changed. We have defeated humankind’s oldest and deadliest enemy, a disease that has killed billions. More than any other in history. 

‘Today, we have ended malaria. Thanks to scientists, leaders and people everywhere the world is now safer for us all. 

‘Future generations will be protected and the world will be stronger to defeat all diseases.’

Turning back to his current age, David added: ‘Right now, the fight is harder than ever and as a father, it breaks my heart that a child dies every two minutes from malaria. A future free from this disease is possible in our lifetimes. 

‘We must unite and tell our leaders that we won’t stop until the job is done. Join me and share to declare that malaria must die so millions can live.’

Before and after shots were revealed to show how David had been aged for the video, showcasing that it is possible for us to see an end to the disease within our lifetimes if action is taken to wipe it out. 

He is working with the charity Malaria No More UK as he feels the cause is close to his heart as a father of four after hearing how many children die of the disease. 



David said: ‘I’ve worked with Malaria No More UK since 2009, supporting campaigns and helping shine a light on the challenge.

‘Their campaigns always use great creativity and innovation to attract attention to the issue and I’m delighted also to have met some of the inspiring people who are working so hard to end this disease.’

Malaria is a life-threatening disease spread by mosquitos and occurs in over 100 countries and territories, and is one of the world’s biggest killers, with a child dying from malaria every two minutes according to the World Health Organisation. 

The NHS states that the main risk areas for malaria are in tropical regions of the world, including large areas of Africa and Asia, Central and South America, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, some parts of the Middle East and some Pacific Islands. 

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