Jenelle Evans is Still Defending Mackenzie McKee: I Think Cheyenne is the REAL Racist!

How far do you have to sink before the likes of Jenelle Evans tries to ride to your rescue?

That’s where Mackenzie McKee is right now.

Jenelle is defending Mackenzie against backlash for Mackenzie’s racist comments.

She’s insisting that Cheyenne Floyd is the real “racist” in this situation, if you can believe it.

Mackenzie claims that she was “bullied” by “mean girls” — her Teen Mom castmates.

She later insisted that Cheyenne was behind it, that Cheyenne “hates” her and production accommodated her whims.

Cheyenne has fired back at Mackenzie’s “odd fixation” on her and asked to be left alone.

In part, this stems from Mackenzie’s outrageous comments about Vice President Kamala Harris earlier this year.

We hate to even repeat this, but she spoke of “colored women” while discussing VP Harris … which is simply unacceptable.

For the record, the primary backlash came from fans — not from Cheyenne.

Jenelle Evans smelled a subject that’s very relevant to her life — racism — and jumped at the chance to comment.

Speaking to The Sun, the disgraced former Teen Mom star is defending Mackenzie and trashing Cheyenne.

“Cheyenne is the one that posted that she hates white people,” Jenelle said, referring to deleted 2011 tweets.

“So I don’t even want to hear that,” Jenelle complained.

“If anyone’s racist, it would be Cheyenne,” she outrageously asserted.

Jenelle argued that this is because it’s Cheyenne “who has been tweeting about it for way longer.”

Just to clarify, that is categorically absurd for a number of reasons, but we’ll get to that later.

As for Mackenzie’s racism scandal from earlier this year, Jenelle apparently thinks that it’s no big deal.

She asked if Cheyenne “would have rather Mackenzie said the word Black? Cheyenne has said much worse.”

“Cheyenne is like ‘Oh you’re racist. I don’t want to film with her. I don’t want be sat with her,'” Jenelle alleged.

“No Cheyenne,” she continued, “you just don’t like white people.”

Apparently, Jenelle feels that people are unfairly going after Mackenzie.

“It makes me mad that nobody brings up Cheyenne,” Jenelle expressed.

“And then everyone drags everyone else for saying colored woman,” she wrote.

Jenelle added: “like, come on.”

Cheyenne’s tweets have been covered to death, but since Jenelle is so eagerly bring them up, let’s discuss them once again.

“My mom said I can’t see [the movie] ‘The Help,’ she knows I already have a problem with white people,” Cheyenne tweeted ten years ago.

A follow-up tweet read: “Last night I saw [‘The Help’] and I wanted to kill every white person I saw.”

Those tweets and others with a similar tone were deleted long ago.

Cheyenne also issued a public apology when they surfaced.

“As a mom of a baby with a biracial dad, and a member of a new blended, mix-raced family,” she began at that time.

Cheynne’s apology continued: “I am so sorry that these messages resurfaced.”

“And,” she added, “they do not represent me at all.”

While her past tweets were certainly hostile and arguably hurtful, were they racist?

Of course not. Words mean things.

Racism is not an opinion. It is a complex and structural system of oppression.

Cheyenne cannot be racist against white people because her words have no power behind them.

That doesn’t mean that what she said was very nice — it wasn’t. Cheyenne said as much.

But harboring a bias, in he past or present, against white people is not racism, because white people are not marginalized.

In fact, it’s not uncommon for marginalized groups to vent about their lived experiences on the receiving end of systemic oppression.

Not everyone does this, of course, but any group of LGBTQ+ friends might vent about straight or cis people.

A friend group of people of color might bond over their experiences with white people in a nation infested with white supremacy.

Disabled people remark on the nonsense that they face from ableds.

In fact, though women are not a minority in a numerical sense, plenty of women will sigh and go “ugh, men,” very justifiably.

Those words do not hold the power to oppress anyone, no matter what incels on Reddit try to insist.

Why? Because in a patriarchal culture and society where women only gained the right to open bank accounts a couple of generations ago, griping about men is not harmful.

When Mackenzie referred to “colored women,” she wasn’t oppressing Vice President Harris.

But she was using the same term that was used to identify women of color as a servant class, the same word that hung over segregated bathrooms.

That is not the sole reason for why Mackenzie is unpopular, but she did deserve the backlash that she received.

Jenelle would not understand any of this. It’s not necessarily that she can’t — she simply does not want to.

She has chosen a truly unenviable life through a series of decisions, including marrying David Eason, who embodies all of the worst qualities that a person could have.

Jenelle has chosen to ruin her life and that of her children. She sees Mackenzie’s feud as an opportunity to desperately grasp for relevance.

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